D H
Sep 30, 2018 · Last update 1 mo. ago.

What are some good ways to engage with and involve the older people in your community?

Nearly 700 million people are over the age of 60 in the world. A growing number of people of this demographic are reporting to feel socially isolated and feeling increasingly lonely, a mental state which is thought to be linked to both physical and mental decline in the elderly, and especially conditions such as Alzheimer's. How can we fight senior loneliness on a local community level?
Stats of Viewpoints
Senior focussed, themed social events
1 agrees
0 disagrees
Encourage them into part time employment or volunteering
1 agrees
0 disagrees
Skill transfer workshops
1 agrees
0 disagrees
Special interest groups
1 agrees
0 disagrees
Walking club, to both socialise and exercise
1 agrees
0 disagrees
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Senior focussed, themed social events

Hosting a social event, such as a fair, concert, dance, cinema show or competition in a style or tradition that older people would be accustomed to from when they were younger can serve as a good way to connect different generations. Older people will be attracted to reminisce and feel nostalgia of bygone times, but they can also pass down and connect with future generations that may be interested in local traditions and the insight of older generations. Tickets could be charged and the events monetised to fund the event or local social issues that effect any generation. A good example of this is “The Posh Club” in London: web.facebook.com/ThePoshClub1/?_rdc=1&_rdr

greatseniorliving.com/health-wellness/social-well-being goldencarers.com/theme-days

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D H
Oct 2
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DH edited this paragraph
https://www.greatseniorliving.com/health-wellness/social-well-being https://www.goldencarers.com/theme-days/

Encourage them into part time employment or volunteering

Although many older people may enjoy retirement, for some it just adds to feelings of loneliness and social isolation. Many countries focus on supplying continued part time or casual employment for older people to help ease this problem. The idea being that keeping busy, keeping mind and body active, and keeping older people socialising on a day to day basis, will all help to minimise the number of people requiring care homes.

seniorliving.org/organization/volunteer news.stanford.edu/2016/09/08/older-people-offer-resource-children-need-stanford-report-says seniorsafetyadvice.com/how-do-you-engage-the-elderly-in-social-activities

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D H
Oct 2
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DH edited this paragraph
https://www.seniorliving.org/organization/volunteer/ https://news.stanford.edu/2016/09/08/older-people-offer-resource-children-need-stanford-report-says/ https://seniorsafetyadvice.com/how-do-you-engage-the-elderly-in-social-activities/

Skill transfer workshops

With retirement posing a large depression risk to the recently retired, the importance of older people keeping busy for as long as possible is irrefutable. Businesses can also suffer as people retire, as a possible skill deficit in its younger workforce may prove to be problematic. In the United States this is causing a sensation some are calling boomerang retirees, with recent retirees finding retired life difficult, return to work to add to the talent pool and pass on their skills. However more could be done in the form of a flexible scheme whereby more retirees and skill deficient workplaces are catered for more flexibly, both issues can therefore be addressed through a comprehensive skill transfer scheme.

health.usnews.com/health-care/patient-advice/articles/2017-07-28/can-retirement-be-a-depression-risk nytimes.com/2016/12/16/business/retirement/boomerang-boom-more-firms-tapping-the-skills-of-the-recently-retired.html

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Latest conversation
D H
Oct 2
Approved
DH edited this paragraph
https://health.usnews.com/health-care/patient-advice/articles/2017-07-28/can-retirement-be-a-depression-risk https://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/16/business/retirement/boomerang-boom-more-firms-tapping-the-skills-of-the-recently-retired.html

Special interest groups

Sadly, one feature of ageing that affects many in the world is the gradual loss of mental faculties. However studies show that in addition to a balanced diet and exercise, social connectedness and intellectual activity can help stave off age related diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Special interest groups such as a drama, art, cooking, crafts or language group could fill this void allowing older people to engage socially while exercising cognitively, through self expression, improvisation or simply a shared interest.

geriatricspt.org/special-interest-groups/health-promotion-wellness geron.org/stay-connected/interest-groups

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D H
Oct 2
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DH edited this paragraph
https://geriatricspt.org/special-interest-groups/health-promotion-wellness/ https://www.geron.org/stay-connected/interest-groups

Walking club, to both socialise and exercise

The UK has been named as the most overweight nation in Western Europe, with three in four over-65s obese or overweight. With obesity being linked to a multitude of health risks and thought to exacerbate other age related diseases, a solution involving exercise will undoubtedly address both the health and happiness of socially isolated retirees. As research increasingly links exercise with mental well being, a gentle way to socialise and exercise for older people would be to join a walking group such “Ramblers” (in the UK), or even start a local one yourself.

theguardian.com/society/2014/jun/26/three-quarters-over-65s-overweight eastrenfrewshire.gov.uk/article/2601/Social-and-leisure-activities-for-adults-and-older-people

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Latest conversation
D H
Oct 2
Approved
DH edited this paragraph
https://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/jun/26/three-quarters-over-65s-overweight https://www.eastrenfrewshire.gov.uk/article/2601/Social-and-leisure-activities-for-adults-and-older-people
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