Daniel Halliday
Sep 9 · Last update 4 mo. ago.
What lead to the rise and fall of Saddam Hussein?
Saddam Hussein held power in Iraq from 1979 until 2003, known as a brutal dictator, he was eventually tried for crimes against humanity in 2006. But what lead to the rise and eventual hanging of the "Butcher of Baghdad"?
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Hussein was a poster boy for Islamic revivalism, but fell as different entities continued to capitalise on unrest in the region
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He rose as a reformer, became a brutal dictator & fell as former western proxy, amidst oil concerns
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Saddam rose and fell as a dictator and popularised middle eastern anti-US sentiment in the process
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Hussein was a poster boy for Islamic revivalism, but fell as different entities continued to capitalise on unrest in the region

Saddam Hussein rose to power as part of the officially secular Socialist Ba’ath Party of Iraq, but secured power for himself in 1979. It was following the First Gulf War that Saddam Hussein would frequently cite that his survival as the leader of Iraq was proof that the United States had lost the war. This overemphasis appealed to many across the Arab world and it was around this time that Hussein began portraying himself as a devout Muslim, in an effort to maintain some conservative religious favourability at least. During this phase Hussein also ordered the production of a ‘Blood Qur’an’ made from 27 litres of his blood, thus solidifying his image as the Iraqi portrayal of Islamic Revivalism. He would later fall as different international entities continued to try and capitalise on this region of the world, leading to his eventual trial for war crimes.

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He rose as a reformer, became a brutal dictator & fell as former western proxy, amidst oil concerns

Saddam Hussein rose to a position of power as deputy chairman of the Iraqi Ba’athist Revolutionary Command Council in 1968, actively pursuing both the modernisation and repression of Iraqi society. His aggressive temperament, opportunistic greed and land-grab tactics lead to him assuming a position as an international proxy against Iran in the 1980’s. With the economies of Iraq and Iran subsequently destroyed in a bitter war of attrition, Hussein later turned his strong, internationally sponsored, military westward and invaded Kuwait, sparking the First Gulf War and destroying Iraq-US relations. This arguably lead to Hussein being used as a scapegoat by the US and Britain a decade later amidst a climate of oil supply concerns, and the invasion of Iraq became the most famous intelligence, PR and political disaster of the decade, and unleashing disastrous instability that has perpetuates to this day.

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Saddam rose and fell as a dictator and popularised middle eastern anti-US sentiment in the process

Saddam Hussein seized power following a proposed merger between the Iraq and Syrian states and Ba’athist parties.

Hussein’s outspoken nature, his speed to openly threaten chemical weapons attacks, coupled with false intelligence lead to a British-American coalition to remove Hussein and secure alleged Iraqi weapons stockpiles in 2003. Arguably his removal lead to a power vacuum causing a much longer period of instability in the country than was expect, and both the mishandling of this situation plus Hussein’s outspoken opposition to both US foreign policy and Israel lead to growing anti-Western sentiment in the Middle East.

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