Daniel Halliday
Sep 15 · Last update 2 mo. ago.
Could the Montreal Protocol serve as a model for a cohesive climate change policy?
Are there lessons to be learned from the success of the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer? Can its success be replicated moving forward with climate change policy?
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The Montreal Protocol has had a direct effect on climate change, a largely negative one
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The issue of climate change is inevitably much more complex than the depletion of atmospheric ozone
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Yes, it was a massive success and should serve as inspiration to future international policy
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The Montreal Protocol has had a direct effect on climate change, a largely negative one

One of the outcomes of the Montreal protocols has directly affected climate change, and contributed to it to some degree. The Montreal Protocol effectively replaced the industrial use of CFC gases with HFC’s that do not contribute to atmospheric ozone loss. HFC’s on the other hand are a greenhouse gas, and there use helps infra-red radiation say within the Earth's atmosphere, slowly raising the atmosphere's ambient temperature.

The Montreal protocol was an international treaty to protect the Earth's ozone layer and it ultimately banned the use of CFC’s in refrigeration, air conditioning and propellant systems, ultimately replacing many of them with HFC’s. CFC’s degraded in the atmosphere, the spare chlorine atom bonding with ionic oxygen leading to less O3 (ozone) developing. The Montreal Protocol may have proved to be effective policy for what it set out to do, but it fed into the much bigger, far reaching and potentially catastrophic issue of global warming. The Montreal protocol remains a narrow solution to a narrow problem, climate change calls for a much more in-depth change to industry, attitudes and society as a whole to be a success and save human life as we know it.

ghgonline.org/othershfcs.htm eia-international.org/blog/hfcs-the-greenhouse-gas-the-world-is-finally-talking-about

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Daniel Halliday
Jun 5
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DH edited this paragraph
The Montreal protocol was an international treaty to protect the Earth's ozone layer and it ultimately banned the use of CFC’s in refrigeration, air conditioning and propellant systems, ultimately replacing many of them with HFC’s. CFC’s degraded in the atmosphere, the spare chlorine atom bonding with ionic oxygen leading to less O3 (ozone) developing. The Montreal Protocol may have proved to be effective policy for what it set out to do, but it fed into the much bigger, far reaching and potentially catastrophic issue of global warming. The Montreal protocol remains a narrow solution to a narrow problem, climate change calls for a much more in-depth change to industry, attitudes and society as a whole to be a success and save human life as we know it.
The issue of climate change is inevitably much more complex than the depletion of atmospheric ozone

Protective ozone layer policy was introduced with precise technological alternatives already widely available. Climate change is such a wide ranging, all encompassing issue, that affects so many industries, it is not surprising that it was met with much greater opposition. There's not much the Montreal Protocol has to offer climate change policy in the way of inspiration, as climate change is a much more complex issue, much more self sustaining, with much fewer viable solutions.

The solution to ozone depletion was simpler, and the gases causing it were not as wide spread in society and global industry. Climate change involves all industries linked to fossil fuel use and agriculture, and has a limited number of viable alternatives, either in effectiveness or scale. Whereas Ozone depletion was linked to CFC’s in cooling and propellant systems and had many other alternatives, one of which is HFC which is unfortunately also a green house gas and has contributed to climate change.

livescience.com/38519-refrigerant-hfcs-devastating-to-climate.html climatesight.org/2011/03/30/ozone-depletion-and-climate-change

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Daniel Halliday
Jun 5
Approved
DH edited this paragraph
The solution to ozone depletion was simpler, and the gases causing it were not as wide spread in society and global industry. Climate change involves all industries linked to fossil fuel use and agriculture, and has a limited number of viable alternatives, either in effectiveness or scale. Whereas Ozone depletion was linked to CFC’s in cooling and propellant systems and had many other alternatives, one of which is HFC which is unfortunately also a green house gas and has contributed to climate change.
Yes, it was a massive success and should serve as inspiration to future international policy

We can see from the results of the Montreal protocol, the hole in the ozone layer replenished prematurely, that this protocol was a particularly decisive and effective method at dealing with this specific problem. The bringing together of politicians, scientists and famous icons to bring the issue down to an understandable level for the average person made this a compelling issue. A similar approach should have been put into place to address climate change.

Arguably this has not been the case with climate change with numerous scientists, politicians and people of social standing, have publicly doubted the legitimacy of climate science. These differences are arguably slowly balancing themselves out through mounting evidence, and the effort of outspoken scientists and educators, so it may just take time to reach the same consensus before comprehensive policy can be formed. However the Montreal Protocol established regulations to achieve clearly stated goals and decide on reasonable phasing out of CFC chemicals. This is one reason the agreement was effective and is widely recognised as the most successful international agreement, with former UN secretary Kofi Annan describing it as: “ the single most successful international agreement to date”.

theozonehole.com/montreal.htm nasa.gov/topics/earth/features/ozone-history.html

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Daniel Halliday
Jun 5
Approved
DH edited this paragraph
Arguably this has not been the case with climate change with numerous scientists, politicians and people of social standing, have publicly doubted the legitimacy of climate science. These differences are arguably slowly balancing themselves out through mounting evidence, and the effort of outspoken scientists and educators, so it may just take time to reach the same consensus before comprehensive policy can be formed. However the Montreal Protocol established regulations to achieve clearly stated goals and decide on reasonable phasing out of CFC chemicals. This is one reason the agreement was effective and is widely recognised as the most successful international agreement, with former UN secretary Kofi Annan describing it as: “ the single most successful international agreement to date”.
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