Daniel Halliday
Oct 4 · Last update 7 mo. ago.
How can we address the world teacher shortage?
As we celebrate World Teachers’ Day the UN seek to remind us that “the right to education means the right to a qualified teacher”. But also according to the UN, 25.8 million school teachers need to be recruited to provide every child in the world with a primary education. So the fundamental question to achieve this remains, how can we deal with this teacher gap?
Stats of Viewpoints
Encourage more people to qualify as a teacher by offering alternatives routes into this career
1 agrees
0 disagrees
Boosting salaries will inevitably boost applicants and increase job satisfaction
1 agrees
0 disagrees
On the job induction and mentorship schemes
1 agrees
0 disagrees
Offer a means of professional development through leadership positions
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Evaluation and feedback for both teachers and schools
0 agrees
0 disagrees
AI and Technology
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Address the gender imbalance
0 agrees
0 disagrees
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Encourage more people to qualify as a teacher by offering alternatives routes into this career

Teaching degrees typically take four years to achieve, either as a straight education degree or an additional qualification on top of a non-teaching bachelor’s degree. This pathway to becoming a teacher can be arduous, costly, and possibly off-putting for many from lower income backgrounds that may have a lot to bring the profession. One way to tackle this problem is to provide alternatives routes to this career path, for example the “School Direct” program offered in the UK, where you can train while working and getting paid as a teacher.

Likewise there are multiple schemes in America to offer an alternative pathway into teaching for candidates with the applicable knowledge. This has lead to 14.6% of new teachers entering their career via an alternative route in 2012 [1], and 20% by 2014 [2]. This obviously seems to be a useful method of tackling the teacher shortage. But with these schemes being run in 47 states in the US they could go further, likewise in some European countries it takes even longer to qualify as a teacher, so methods such as this could be even more useful elsewhere.

ucas.com/teaching-option/school-direct-salaried [1] teachercertificationdegrees.com/alternative [2] thestaffingstream.com/2018/05/10/five-key-ways-and-more-to-help-solve-the-teacher-shortage-crisis

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Daniel Halliday
Apr 23
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DH edited this paragraph
https://www.ucas.com/teaching-option/school-direct-salaried [1] https://www.teachercertificationdegrees.com/alternative/ [2] http://www.thestaffingstream.com/2018/05/10/five-key-ways-and-more-to-help-solve-the-teacher-shortage-crisis/
Boosting salaries will inevitably boost applicants and increase job satisfaction

There are two main problems affecting the shortage of teachers worldwide, not enough applicants and too many leaving the profession, and money speaks to both of these groups. Boosting teacher's salaries will attract more applicants from a wider background and make teaching a more desirable job. It will also help keep teachers in this highly stressful career, as a good salary will help teachers feel valued and ultimately feel the job is worth the tremendous amount of energy and effort that is required.

But more money is not just needed for teacher's salaries but is desperately needed for funding also in many countries. Thousands of teachers in Oklahoma staged a walk out in April 2018 in protest over the shocking level of underfunded state education in their region. Massive cuts to school funding often leaves teachers living on a tight budget, in badly maintained school buildings, often having to take second jobs, with no budget for materials, a lack or major shortage course books, and overly large class sizes. This leaves such teachers feeling undervalued and underappreciated, causing them to leave and putting off new applicants. Both problems could be fixed with better funding and greater financial incentives.

youtube.com/watch?v=bQyW5X7IGIQ

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Daniel Halliday
Apr 23
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DH edited this paragraph
There are two main problems affecting the shortage of teachers worldwide, not enough applicants and too many leaving the profession, and money speaks to both of these groups. Boosting teacher's salaries will attract more applicants from a wider background and make teaching a more desirable job. It will also help keep teachers in this highly stressful career, as a good salary will help teachers feel valued and ultimately feel the job is worth the tremendous amount of energy and effort that is required.
On the job induction and mentorship schemes

One of the main problems facing the teaching profession is teacher retention; due to the high stress environment of the classroom, many teachers decide to leave the profession within the first three years. Induction and mentorship programs, to effectively continue teacher development on the job, have been suggested as methods to address teacher retention while helping to increase teaching standards also. High-quality comprehensive professional support programs aimed at new teachers would help better equip them with the preparation and classroom management skills to effectively settle into their new position. Likewise offering them one to one support for specific classroom problems they may face when starting their career may help new teachers cope with unforeseen challenges.

A study by the Nation Center for Education Statistics in the US found that mentorship was a key factor in teacher attrition. Eighty percent of teachers who had a mentor or induction scheme in their first year on the job stayed in the profession for at least the first five years, whereas sixty-four percent of teachers without a mentor survived this initial five year period. This is a significant percentage and as teacher retention is the main factor affecting the teaching shortage this could help in addressing this pressing issue.

ecs.org/wp-content/uploads/Mitigating-Teacher-Shortages-Induction-Mentorship.pdf ecs.org/mitigating-teacher-shortages-induction-and-mentorship-programs nces.ed.gov/pubs2015/2015196.pdf

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Daniel Halliday
Apr 23
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DH edited this paragraph
A study by the Nation Center for Education Statistics in the US found that mentorship was a key factor in teacher attrition. Eighty percent of teachers who had a mentor or induction scheme in their first year on the job stayed in the profession for at least the first five years, whereas sixty-four percent of teachers without a mentor survived this initial five year period. This is a significant percentage and as teacher retention is the main factor affecting the teaching shortage this could help in addressing this pressing issue.
Offer a means of professional development through leadership positions

Many people view teaching as a vocation, but some view it as a career dead-end, that offers little to no change or progression. This pervasive view makes attracting teachers to the field difficult. Providing teacher leadership opportunities could offer professional development solutions, while fostering a positive and competitive professional environment, allowing teachers to influence the achievement of students through their own professional in-school achievement.

Research into teacher retention often shows lack of career pathways as a reason for leaving the profession, especially with the best candidates. Leadership roles can be formal or informal, but allow more experience staff to foster a learning environment and aid their colleague's development. “Teachers who planned to stay in the classroom for up to 5 years cited opportunities for professional learning or high standards among staff as most important” [1]. Such opportunities have been found to increase energy and cooperation in the profession and foster a better atmosphere, but most importantly are the dominant factor in retaining teachers.

ecs.org/wp-content/uploads/Mitigating-Teacher-Shortages-Teacher-leaders.pdf [1] teachersnetwork.org/effectiveteachers/images/CTQ_FULLResearchReport__021810.pdf ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/sept07/vol65/num01/The-Many-Faces-of-Leadership.aspx

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Daniel Halliday
Apr 23
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DH edited this paragraph
https://www.ecs.org/wp-content/uploads/Mitigating-Teacher-Shortages-Teacher-leaders.pdf [1] http://teachersnetwork.org/effectiveteachers/images/CTQ_FULLResearchReport__021810.pdf http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/sept07/vol65/num01/The-Many-Faces-of-Leadership.aspx
Evaluation and feedback for both teachers and schools

Teacher turnover is a big contributing factor to the shortage of qualified teachers in the world. TNTP found that nearly half of the high performing teachers in America’s urban schools leave the job within the first five years and 75% of these teachers said they would have stayed in their position if their issues were addressed by the school. It is therefore imperative that not just teachers but schools and the entire infrastructure around them are also held accountable and helped to develop to benefit everyone involved, schools, teachers and students.

Accountability and failing to address complaints and issues in schools was the main contributing factor in the massive scale of strike action taken in West Virginia, Oklahoma, Arizona, Kentucky, North Carolina, and Colorado in 2018. An accumulation of failures to address complaint against the legislature not meeting requirements of funding over many years, this issue in the presence of a proper system of evaluation and feedback should exist throughout the school system not just for students. A comprehensive evaluation and feedback system could provide the transparency and accountability that these leaving teachers require to solve the issues leading to them abandoning the occupation in such high numbers.

tntp.org/assets/documents/TNTP_Irreplaceables_2012.pdf ecs.org/wp-content/uploads/Mitigating-Teacher-Shortages-Evaluation-and-Feedback.pdf vice.com/en_us/article/d3qwzq/why-i-left-my-public-school-job-in-oklahoma-to-teach-in-abu-dhabi-v25n3 youtube.com/watch?v=nva8UofZ3fY

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Daniel Halliday
Apr 23
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DH edited this paragraph
Teacher turnover is a big contributing factor to the shortage of qualified teachers in the world. TNTP found that nearly half of the high performing teachers in America’s urban schools leave the job within the first five years and 75% of these teachers said they would have stayed in their position if their issues were addressed by the school. It is therefore imperative that not just teachers but schools and the entire infrastructure around them are also held accountable and helped to develop to benefit everyone involved, schools, teachers and students.
AI and Technology

The future of teaching, along with many professions, will undoubtedly change with the increasing integration of AI augmentation and technology in the classroom. From aiding teachers in planning and delivering lessons more effectively, to eventual AI led teaching and tutoring, AI could prove a big help in addressing the global teaching shortage. Companies such as VIPKID, a Beijing based English learning platform, have recently entered into a partnership with Microsoft to help promote AI education and develop future AI education solutions.

As VIPKID has access to billions of hours of recorded one-to-one tuition (archiving all of their online classes across the globe) they will be able to provide a neural network with so much experience AI may eventually outperform human teachers, due to access to an inhuman level of experience. Additionally the ability programmers, through manipulating computer graphics to generate a teaching avatar (like Spiderman), could keep younger learners especially entertained and encourage greater concentration. Plus technological improvements such as facial recognition software could accumulate a mass of data and allow researchers to quantify, and determine scientifically, the best teaching practices, the most effective body language, tone of voice, method of delivery and even help teachers improve on the job.

news.cgtn.com/news/3d3d514e30637a4d79457a6333566d54/share_p.html

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Daniel Halliday
Apr 23
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DH edited this paragraph
As VIPKID has access to billions of hours of recorded one-to-one tuition (archiving all of their online classes across the globe) they will be able to provide a neural network with so much experience AI may eventually outperform human teachers, due to access to an inhuman level of experience. Additionally the ability programmers, through manipulating computer graphics to generate a teaching avatar (like Spiderman), could keep younger learners especially entertained and encourage greater concentration. Plus technological improvements such as facial recognition software could accumulate a mass of data and allow researchers to quantify, and determine scientifically, the best teaching practices, the most effective body language, tone of voice, method of delivery and even help teachers improve on the job.
Address the gender imbalance

In the majority of countries in the world there is a gender imbalance in the teaching profession that results in there being far more female teachers working in education. This imbalance becomes particularly pronounced in primary and pre-school education, around 20% of primary education teachers being male in the US and only 10% in Australia. Researchers from the US have claimed that primary teaching especially is seen as less intellectual and more emotional than teaching older children, therefore deterring many men.

Studies from Nigeria, Croatia and the United States have been conducted to determine reasons for gender imbalance in this industry, and results were varied with different reasoning and attitudes being behind attitudes toward this. But the attitude remains widespread that full development of students relies on a balanced range of inputs and teaching styles, meaning students will benefit emotionally and intellectually from a balance representation of gender roles within primary school years. Ultimately solving this problem would effectively, increase the talent pool and increase the number of teachers trained and available to take these much needed positions.

theconversation.com/we-need-to-support-more-men-to-become-primary-teachers-86775

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Daniel Halliday
Apr 23
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DH edited this paragraph
In the majority of countries in the world there is a gender imbalance in the teaching profession that results in there being far more female teachers working in education. This imbalance becomes particularly pronounced in primary and pre-school education, around 20% of primary education teachers being male in the US and only 10% in Australia. Researchers from the US have claimed that primary teaching especially is seen as less intellectual and more emotional than teaching older children, therefore deterring many men.
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