Daniel Halliday
Oct 4 · Last update 17 days ago.
How can we address the world teacher shortage?
As we celebrate World Teachers’ Day the UN seek to remind us that “the right to education means the right to a qualified teacher”. But also according to the UN, 25.8 million school teachers need to be recruited to provide every child in the world with a primary education. So the fundamental question to achieve this remains, how can we deal with this teacher gap?
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Boosting salaries will inevitably boost applicants and increase job satisfaction
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Encourage more people to qualify as a teacher by offering alternatives routes into this career
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Boosting salaries will inevitably boost applicants and increase job satisfaction

There are two main problems affecting the shortage of teachers worldwide, not enough applicants and too many leaving the profession, and money speaks to both of these groups. Boosting teachers salaries will attract more applicants from a wider background and make teaching a more desirable job. It will also help keep teachers in this highly stressful career, as a good salary will help teachers feel valued and ultimately feel the job is worth the tremendous amount of energy and effort that is required.

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Encourage more people to qualify as a teacher by offering alternatives routes into this career

Teaching degrees typically take four years to achieve, either as a straight education degree or an additional qualification on top of a non-teaching bachelor’s degree. This pathway to becoming a teacher can be arduous, costly, and possibly off-putting for many from lower income backgrounds that may have a lot to bring the profession. One way to tackle this problem is to provide alternatives routes to this career path, for example the “School Direct” program offered in the UK, where you can train while working and getting paid as a teacher.

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