Daniel Halliday
Nov 5 · Last update 8 days ago.
Is it time for independence votes for all overseas or dependent territories?
Following a recent independence vote in New Caledonia, is it time for all former colonial states to give independence votes to their overseas dependent territories?
Stats of Viewpoints
Any movement for independence should be democratic and legal
0 agrees
1 disagrees
There are already enough territorial disputes in the world
1 agrees
0 disagrees
Distinct territories should at least be given their right of self-determination
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Viewpoints
Add New Viewpoint
Any movement for independence should be democratic and legal

Votes for independence need to stem from the democratic will of the people and operate within the correct legal framework. As a result independence should depends on the territory; some countries may be better off with their former colonial economic ties to the country in question. This seems to be the main reason for a ‘Non’ vote to independence in New Caledonia, as the region would no longer receive French subsidies. This legal referendum has meant that New Caledonia has stayed an overseas French territory and remains on good terms with France as the referendum was the result of the mutually ratified Nouméa Accord.

Agree
Disagree
There are already enough territorial disputes in the world

Many regions of the world are currently disputed territories, sometimes even between more than two countries. To encourage more independence votes would actively generate larger volumes of territorial disputes and diplomatic ‘bad blood’ around the world. The problem with many overseas territories is that there may be foreign interests in the region also, take the Falklands for example, independence voting here would surely lead to renewed conflict between Argentina and Britain. Likewise from recent independence votes in Europe it is clear that diplomatic relationships are also at risk from hasty independence votes, as can be see with the Brexit and Catalan independence votes.

Agree
Disagree
Distinct territories should at least be given their right of self-determination

Following the Second World War, decolonisation gradually took place, but for territories that have not been successfully decolonised the UN maintains a list of Non-Self-Governing Territories. Former colonial powers have to report to the UN on a yearly basis in an effort to promote self-determination of such territories, however this state of affairs has garnered much criticism. As international law now protects against aggressive land grabs and maintains self-determination as a human right, the wrongdoings of the past should be undone and indigenous people should be offered the option of independence.

Agree
Disagree
Translate