Masaki Shibutani
Nov 19 · Last update 1 mo. ago.
What is the way to make a world where children can live with peace of mind?
Decades have passed since the Convention on the Rights of the Child was adopted. However, the right of children and improvement of living environment&welfare etc are still not achieved in the world now, and it is still developing. The United Nations and UNICEF are conducting various campaigns every year, but the situation of children in many countries has not improved yet. Because there are various factors that impede the improvement of the rights of children in each country, it is easy to understand that there is no dramatic solution. However, the world needs to solve this serious problem as soon as possible. What kind of method do you think is better one?
Stats of Viewpoints
The grey area of corporal punishment
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Protect children with developmental disorders
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Child protection is more important than children’s rights
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Freedom from circumcision/genital mutilation
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Freedom from passive smoking
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Access to adequate food and health care
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Universal state funded education and ending child labour
0 agrees
0 disagrees
The right to associate with both parents
0 agrees
0 disagrees
Viewpoints
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The grey area of corporal punishment

The United Nation’s Convention on the Rights of the Child makes no specific mention about corporal punishment, although they do reference all form of physical or mental violence, but this treaty has not yet even been ratified by the United States. Even just the risk of physical violence in order to punish a child puts the child’s physical and mental health at risk, while threatening their development. The UN’s treaty needs to be revised and the US need to ratify it, so the estimated 300 million children globally can be protected against corporal punishment, allowing more children to live with peace of mind. data.unicef.org/topic/child-protection/violence/violent-discipline ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/CorporalPunishment.aspx

Agree
Disagree
Protect children with developmental disorders

We are at the dawn of a period of recognition of developmental disorders that affect a large number of children internationally, however many of these issues remain misunderstood by families, the general population and unfortunately in some places even with people working in education and children’s services. With various current education systems failing to deal or address these issues many children with developmental disorders fail to integrate into mainstream education and likewise struggle to integrate properly into society. As research develops educational models should remain open to changing their model to address developmental disorders, integration would be a great step forward in societal education. Failure to adequately address, provide treatment or support for individuals with developmental issues can have a profoundly detrimental effect on them, and further education and legislation would bring peace to 15% of children (according to US federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention).

Agree
Disagree
Child protection is more important than children’s rights

Some of the issues involved with children’s rights are both controversial and misinterpreted, with rights being respected as something inherent to every person and not thought of in the context of choices, vulnerability and understanding. Therefore in the period of childhood, when we are at our most vulnerable, responsibly for exercising rights should be of secondary importance and protection should be the universal approach to defend the well-being of children. A good example is the argument of the appropriate age a child is able to identify their gender identity, with some people being proponents of child gender realignment surgery based on the child’s wishes before they have even reached sexual maturity. This is plainly wrong considering that children will not really understand the complexity of their gender and sexuality identity until they approach adulthood and children should be protected from making decisions such as these, not pushed into a situation to exercise their rights in an ‘adultcentric’ world they may not yet understand.

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Freedom from circumcision/genital mutilation

Even though it remains a controversial issue, with many people seeing it in a distinctly positive light, the practice if circumcision is inherently a form of culturally accepted genital mutilation performed on children. Despite many purported health benefits, any concise evidence for the benefits of circumcision remains elusive or inconclusive, in spite of such widespread practice of male circumcision. Female circumcision used to share a similar level of social acceptance in certain parts of the world but is now frowned upon internationally, and it is time to change the cultural mindset for both genders; this practice should be stopped to protect children worldwide.

Agree
Disagree
Freedom from passive smoking

Although smoking bans in many countries have minimised the amount of second hand smoke children are exposed to on average, passive smoking due to a family member's smoking habits is still thought to effect 40% of children ages 3-11 years in the US for example (according to the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention). Even exposure to a small amount of passive smoke can be hugely detrimental to a child’s health, and responsible for a long list of health and development problems, which can sometimes persist with trace amounts of smoke that lingers on a smokers clothes for example. The question of exposing children to second hand smoke is an extra cruel dilemma as not only are they unable to choose whether they are exposed or not, but the connection to the parent and lack of understand in the child make this a particularly cruel, but extremely hard situation to protect children against.

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Disagree
Access to adequate food and health care

It may seem too simple a solution to bringing peace to children worldwide, but the fact is there are a truly unbelievable amount of children suffering from malnutrition and other easily preventable health problems in nearly every country around the world. Studies have found that even mild malnutrition following short periods of food shortage or drought can have behavioural and developmental impacts on children. The charity organisation Save the Children estimates that there are millions of children living on the verge of famine in Africa alone and relying on emergency food assistance for survival. Likewise the World Bank and the WHO have estimated that nearly half the world lacks access to crucial basic health care services, although it may seem basic there are a lot of children around the world suffering due to basic food and medicinal shortages.

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Disagree
Universal state funded education and ending child labour

In many parts of the world child labour is still a common occurrence, with UNICEF, the ILO and the World Bank indicating that 168 million children aged 5 to 17 are engaged in child labour, becoming trapped in the cycle of poverty as they are deprived of an education. One method that could help achieve an end to child labour is to provide compulsory state funded education for children universally. This would not only make it necessary for children to be in education, providing them a way out of poverty, but would also give parents that cannot afford school some hope, being able to view children as less of a burden and more of an investment.

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Disagree
The right to associate with both parents

In the UK, custody hearings following a family divorce are often biased and in favour of the mother, and unequal contact for divorced parents often ensues. This has lead to protest from fathers rights groups such as Fathers 4 Justice who seek law reform to establish equal parenting rights and allow children the right to associate with both parents in these circumstances. Although the Father 4 Justice campaign gained a lot of media attention through a series of protest stunts they unfortunately failed to provide input for the Children & Families Bill in 2013, an amendment to the older 1989 Children Act. This remains somewhat of an issue in the country and an issue for some parents of both genders internationally.

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